Year: 2012

My Baby Buster


Tribute to my Baby Buster.  This Xmas will be 2 years since he passed away.  I miss him more than I can say.  I cried when he died and I cry still.  He left us too soon.  I know I’ll see him in heaven for there is no place called Paradise without my loving little boy Buster.   Here he is on Papa’s lap. “Sir” is what he called him.  Because he was a little gentleman.  T took care of him for two years, never complaining once about giving him his pills twice a day, paying for expensive medicine, taking him to the vet, holding him until the seizures stopped, cleaning up after him so lovingly as any Papa would.  T had faith that Bussie would recover from Valley Fever- but life had other plans. Not the least hard thing to bear when they go from us, these quiet friends, is that they carry away with them so many years of our own lives. John Galsworthy sharing a sunny spot with sister To call him a …

eye poetry


Holy cow!  I had to share these gorgeous prints found on Etsy.  I actually found them through http://www.79ideas.org .  They are so lovely, soft and sweet.  Eye poetry is very fitting.   The lovely images are from here: http://www.etsy.com/shop/EyePoetryPhotography?ref=seller_info photographer: Irene Suchocki         She also sells iPhone cases that are beautiful too!  Check her out when you get a chance.  I tried to contact her to see if I could do a little interview but for some reason I wasn’t able to get through.  (So, Irene, if you are reading this somehow, I hope you will message me or email me at feefeehugs@gmail.com so I can do a little interview!)

Lambie


I have a special place in my heart for lambs as you can tell from my “Lambie My Love” pinboard found here: http://pinterest.com/feefeern/lambie-my-love/ My mom bought me a little lamb (stuffed animal) when I was a young child: Lambie (on right) with hubby’s childhood toy, Bellybutton We were shopping in a department story and I saw this little lamb as part of a display.  I carried it around the store and wanted to take it home but mom said no.  I set it down and cried.  It wasn’t a pouty, bratty cry but a truly sad, quiet goodbye kind of cry.  I walked to the van and sat in the backseat.  Mom turned on the car.  Then she turned it off.  She turned around and asked if I really wanted that lamb and I said “yes, I do.”  I already loved that lamb. Mom sent my brother Eddie back into the store to buy it for me.  I got quite a lot of hand-me-downs as I was the 7th of 8 children Mom and Dad had.  Getting this new …

“Honey Jars”


I recently heard this song for the first time and have listened to it over and over.  This is love. I pick up a broken comb Run it through my thin grey hair Though I don’t have any plans tonight I’m not going anywhere Well, I should’ve seen this coming Don’t know why I’m surprised Every vessel on its way down Takes with it the captain’s lifeThough I’m blind, my dear, I see The parade goes on without me My body aches, my mind, it weeps For you, for youTonight I’m locked outside my building Guess I must have lost the keys So I’ll sit here on the sidewalk Let the snow fall on my knees And if I made it to a payphone I don’t know who I would call So for now I close my eyes and rest My crooked back against the wall I read that old men will see visions Young men will follow dreams I believed it when I read it I see your face in everything Now your honey …

Peacock Feathers for Margaret


This is Margaret.  Margaret is one of my hospice patients. Margaret loves to chat about her past life as an “desert rat.”  She talks about how her dad would collect snakes to sell.  A rattle snake was worth 20 dollars.  She talked about a dress she made that she was very proud of and said her mother was the best in the world.  Margaret has multiple middle names.  One of her names means “sewer.”  She has dementia so carrying on a conversation can be interesting but she does love visitors and socializing.  She also loves to listen to the radio.  One day I started singing a nursery rhyme and she happily joined right in.  It was a wonderful discovery that I could say/sing something she could relate to or remember.  Margaret said she couldn’t go to school but her friend brought her books back from school and lent them to her.  She loved books and dreamed of being a librarian.  She’s blind now so I read her “Daily Bread” to her that is delivered from her church.  She really enjoys …